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Acceleration
From kidsknowit.com, produced by Kids Know It
Learn what acceleration is and how it effects the velocity of objects in this short, computer animated video.  Key concepts covered are: acceleration, velocity, constant velocity, constand acceleration, distand per second, and constand acceleration rate.  Video ends with a 10 question, fill in the blank quiz.
 
Found by begamatt in Acceleration
April 10, 2010 at 11:11 PM
 
Ages: 9 - 13     License: Proprietary
 
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Newton's Second Law: Acceleration - by StudyJams
From scholastic.com, produced by Scholastic
Acceleration is a change in velocity.  That means acceleration can be a change in motion or speed.  Acceleration can be thought of as an object's change in velocity over time.  Learn more about Newton's Second Law of Motion with this cartoon animation from StudyJams.  A short, self-checking quiz is also included with this link.
 
Found by begamatt in Newton's Second Law
May 27, 2011 at 10:07 PM
 
Ages: 8 - 12     License: Proprietary
 
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Acceleration Lab Experiment
From YouTube, produced by Mrs. Clayborn
In this slow motion video for IPS Schools by Clayborn a ball is released on an inclined plane and accelerates due to the force of gravity. At the bottom of the first inclined plane to the beginning of the second inclined plane the ball stops its positive acceleration by nearly maintaining its horizontal speed. On the second ramp the ball accelerates backwards down the slope, or loses speed to a point where it momentarily comes to rest. Therefore this video demonstrates POSITIVE ACCELERATION, ZERO ACCELERATION, AND NEGATIVE ACCELERATION or acceleration in the opposite direction. This video ignores friction and wind resistance and was intended for basic illustration of acceleration. (05:02)
 
Found by begamatt in Acceleration
March 26, 2011 at 06:37 PM
 
Ages: 8 - 16     License: Proprietary
 
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Visual Proof That Centripetal Acceleration = v^2/r - Khan Academy
From YouTube, produced by Salman Khan
Visual proof that centripetal acceleration = v^2/r . This video, which is suitable for high school students, starts with a black screen because the instructor, in his conversational tone, uses it as a 'chalkboard.' Instructor uses different colors for clarification. (10:00)
 
Found by teresahopson in Centripetal Acceleration
August 14, 2009 at 05:54 PM
 
Ages: 14 - 18     License: CC by-nc-nd
 
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   Views: 4531   
 
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Acceleration in its Simplest Terms - PS: Physics at West - Motion 2C
From YouTube, produced by Justin Higgins
Concepts: Acceleration, Recognizing Acceleration, Vector -------------- Part of a Blended Classroom taught at Millard West High School. (06:20)
 
Found by jahiggins in Mechanics
September 19, 2014 at 11:09 PM
 
Ages: 13 - 18     License: CC by-sa
 
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   Views: 3344   
 
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Centripetal Acceleration (Part 2)
From YouTube
More intuition on centripetal acceleration. A simple orbit problem. This video, which is suitable for high school students, starts with a black screen because the instructor, in his conversational tone, uses it as a 'chalkboard.' Instructor uses different colors for clarification. Run time 10:10.
 
Found by teresahopson in Centripetal Acceleration
August 14, 2009 at 05:20 PM
 
Ages: 14 - 18     License: Undetermined
 
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   Views: 3062   
 
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Professor Lewin Introduces Velocity and Acceleration
From WatchKnow, produced by MIT Opencourseware
Lewin introduces velocity and acceleration to his students first by drawing graphs on his famous chalk boards and then by using an awesome demonstration. He actually fires a gun in his class and measures the velocity of the bullet! This video is probably too much to show high school students in class, but it's great for a teacher who needs to brush up on velocity and acceleration. (51:08)
 
Found by tyler.arnold in Angular Velocity
July 31, 2012 at 05:15 PM
 
Ages: 16 - 18     License: Undetermined
 
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   Views: 2947   
 
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Dropping a Ball from 2.0 Meters - An Introductory Free-Fall Acceleration Problem
From YouTube, produced by Flipping Physics
In this introductory free-fall acceleration problem we analyze a video of a medicine ball being dropped to determine the final velocity and the time in free-fall.  Included are three common mistakes students make.  "Why include mistakes?" you might ask.  Well, it is important to understand what happens when you make mistakes so that you can recognize them in the future.  There is also brief description of "parallax" and how it affects what you see in the video compared to reality.

Content Times:
0:26 Reading and viewing the problem
0:50 Describing the parallax issue
1:52 Translating the problem to physics
2:05 1st common mistake: Velocity final is not zero
3:09 Finding the 3rd UAM variable, initial velocity
3:56 Don't we need to know the mass of the medicine ball?
4:35 Solving for the final velocity in the y direction: part (a)
5:39 Identifying our 2nd common mistake: Square root of a negative number?
7:56 Solving for the change in time: part (b)
8:28 Identifying our 3rd common mistake: Negative time?
9:36 Please don't write negative down!
10:27 Does reality match the physics?
11:07 The Review

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Next Video: Graphing the Drop of a Ball from 2.0 Meters - An Introductory Free-Fall Acceleration Problem

Previous Video: Analyzing the Apollo 15 Feather and Hammer Drop -- A Basic Introductory Free-Fall Problem
 
Found by Flipping Physics in One-Dimensional Motion
December 22, 2013 at 01:29 PM
 
Ages: 13 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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Graphing the Drop of a Ball from 2.0 Meters - An Introductory Free-Fall Acceleration Problem
From YouTube, produced by Flipping Physics
This video continues a problem we already solved involving dropping a ball from 2.0 meters. Now we determine how to draw the position, velocity and acceleration as functions of time graphs.

Content Times:
0:17 Reviewing the previous lesson
1:00 Acceleration as a function of time
1:31 Velocity as a function of time
2:39 Position as a function of time
3:56 The Review

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Next Video:
Throwing a Ball up to 2.0 Meters & Proving the Velocity at the Top is Zero

Previous Video:
Dropping a Ball from 2.0 Meters - An Introductory Free-Fall Acceleration Problem
 
Found by Flipping Physics in One-Dimensional Motion
December 22, 2013 at 01:31 PM
 
Ages: 13 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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Acceleration - Khan Academy
From YouTube, produced by Salman Khan
Calculating the acceleration of a Porshe
 
Found by teresahopson in Acceleration
September 18, 2012 at 06:25 AM
 
Ages: 14 - 18     License: CC by-nc-nd
 
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Average Velocity for Constant Acceleration - Khan Academy
From YouTube, produced by Salman Khan
Sal Khan calculates average velocity when acceleration is constant. (14:10)
 
Found by teresahopson in Acceleration
September 18, 2012 at 06:23 AM
 
Ages: 14 - 18     License: CC by-nc-nd
 
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   Views: 2135   
 
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Acceleration of Aircraft Carrier Takeoff - Khan Academy
From YouTube, produced by Salman Khan
Using Sal Khan explores what we know about takeoff velocity and runway length to determine acceleration. (14:16)
 
Found by teresahopson in Acceleration
September 18, 2012 at 06:21 AM
 
Ages: 14 - 18     License: CC by-nc-nd
 
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   Views: 1965   
 
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Angular Acceleration Introduction
From YouTube, produced by Jonathan Thomas-Palmer
Angular acceleration is introduced by way of linear acceleration. The units of radians per second squared are discussed. Examples of objects which angular acceleration are shown. Want acceleration.html">Lecture Notes
This is an AP Physics 1 topic.

Content Times:
0:23 Average angular acceleration
1:02 Angular acceleration units
1:37 Demonstrating objects which have angular acceleration

Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos!

Next Video: accelerations-record.html">Angular Accelerations of a Record Player

Previous Video: Introductory Angular Velocity Problem - A Turning Bike Tire

Please support me on Patreon!

Thank you to Aarti Sangwan, Scott Carter, and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
 
Found by Flipping Physics in Rotational Motion
June 26, 2017 at 08:21 AM
 
Ages: 10 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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Deriving the Acceleration due to Gravity on any Planet and specifically Mt. Everest
From YouTube, produced by Jonathan Thomas-Palmer
Derive the acceleration due to gravity on any planet. Find the acceleration due to gravity on Mt. Everest. And determine how much higher you could jump on the top of Mt. Everest!
Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic.

Content Times:
0:08 Deriving the acceleration due to gravity on any planet
1:54 Finding the acceleration due to gravity on Mt. Everest
3:16 How much higher could you jump on the top of Mt. Everest?

Next Video: Altitude of Geosynchronous Orbit (aka Geostationary Orbit)

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Previous Video: How Much is a Mermaid Attracted to a Doughnut?

Please support me on Patreon!

Thank you to Christopher Becke and Aarti Sangwan for being my Quality Control Team for this video.

Thank you to Youssef Nasr for transcribing the English subtitles of this video.
 
Found by Flipping Physics in Gravity
December 3, 2017 at 05:03 PM
 
Ages: 10 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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   Views: 1887   
 
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Force and Acceleration on a Turntable, Part 1
From YouTube, produced by North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics
Part of NCSSM Online Physics Collection: This video deals with force and acceleration on a turntable. Part 1 of 2. http://www.dlt.ncssm.edu
 
Found by Joyce Ventimiglia in Friction
February 6, 2012 at 11:10 AM
 
Ages: 15 - 18     License: CC by-nc-sa
 
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   Views: 1872   
 
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Angular Accelerations of a Record Player
From YouTube, produced by Jonathan Thomas-Palmer
A record player is plugged in, uniformly accelerates to 45 revolutions per minute, and then is unplugged. The record player (a) takes 0.85 seconds to get up to speed, (b) spends 3.37 seconds at 45 rpms, and then (c) takes 2.32 seconds to slow down to a stop. What is the average angular acceleration of the record player during all three parts? Want accelerations-record.html">Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic.

Content Times:
0:08 Translating the problem
2:35 Solving part (a) - angular acceleration while speeding up
3:13 Solving part (b) - angular acceleration at a constant angular velocity
3:57 Solving part (c) - angular acceleration while slowing down
4:36 Reflecting on all 3 parts simultaneously

Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos!

Next Video: Uniformly Angularly Accelerated Motion Introduction

Previous Video: acceleration.html">Angular Acceleration Introduction

Please support me on Patreon!

Thank you to Aarti Sangwan, Scott Carter, and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control Team for this video.

 
Found by Flipping Physics in Rotational Motion
July 11, 2017 at 06:52 PM
 
Ages: 10 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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Simple Harmonic Motion - Force, Acceleration, and Velocity at 3 Positions
From YouTube, produced by Jonathan Thomas-Palmer
Identifying the spring force, acceleration, and velocity at the end positions and equilibrium position of simple harmonic motion. Amplitude is also defined and shown. Want acceleration-velocity.html ">Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic.

Content Times:
0:01 Identifying the 3 positions
0:43 Velocity
1:43 Spring Force
2:14 Amplitude
2:30 Acceleration
3:22 Velocity at position 2
4:12 Is simple harmonic motion also uniformly accelerated motion?

Thank you to Anish, Kevin, and Olivia for being my “substitute students” in this video!

Next Video: Horizontal vs. Vertical Mass-Spring System

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Previous Video: Simple Harmonic Motion - Force, Acceleration, and Velocity at 3 Positions

Please support me on Patreon!

Thank you to Jonathan Everett, Sawdog, and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control Team for this video.

Thank you to Youssef Nasr for transcribing the English subtitles of this video
 
Found by Flipping Physics in Simple Harmonic Motion
April 15, 2018 at 03:20 PM
 
Ages: 10 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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Simple Harmonic Motion - Graphs of Position, Velocity, and Acceleration
From YouTube, produced by Jonathan Thomas-Palmer
Position, velocity, and acceleration as a function of time graphs for an object in simple harmonic motion are shown and demonstrated. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic.

Content Times:
0:01 Reviewing the equations
1:46 Position graph
2:50 Velocity graph
4:10 Acceleration graph
5:48 Velocity from position
7:19 Acceleration from velocity

Next Video: Simple Harmonic Motion - Graphs of Mechanical Energies

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Previous Video: acceleration
.html">Simple Harmonic Motion - Velocity and Acceleration Equation Derivations

Please support me on Patreon!

Thank you to Scott Carter, Christopher Becke, and Sawdog for being my Quality Control Team for this video.

Thank you to Youssef Nasr for transcribing the English subtitles of this video.
 
Found by Flipping Physics in Simple Harmonic Motion
June 24, 2018 at 02:15 PM
 
Ages: 12 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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Introduction to Free-Fall and the Acceleration due to Gravity
From YouTube, produced by Flipping Physics
In this lesson we extend our knowledge of Uniformly Accelerated Motion to include freely falling objects.  We talk about what Free-Fall means, how to work with it and how to identify and object in Free-Fall.  Today I get to introduce so many of my favorites: the medicine ball, the vacuum that you can breathe and, of course, little g.

Content Times:
0:22 An Example of An Object in Free-Fall
0:54 Textbook definition of a freely falling object
1:11 We have not defined a "Force" so this is how we define Free-Fall
2:07 No Air Resistance (The Vacuum that You Can Breathe!)
3:10 What does it mean to be in Free-Fall? (The Acceleration due to Gravity)
4:41 The Acceleration due to Gravity - Not on Earth
5:24 g is not constant on Earth.  Very close, but not quite
5:56 Common Misconception: Objects moving upward can be freely falling
6:35 Free-Fall is Uniformly Accelerated Motion
7:27 What does the negative mean in -9.81 m/s^2?
7:57 Is "g" positive or negative?
9:01 How can "g" be not constant and we can use UAM?
10:03 Does mass effect the acceleration due to gravity?
10:47 The Review

Want Lecture Notes?

Previous Video: Reviewing One Dimensional Motion with the Table of Friends

Next Video: Apollo 15 Feather and Hammer Drop
 
Found by Flipping Physics in One-Dimensional Motion
December 22, 2013 at 01:14 PM
 
Ages: 13 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
Rating:  
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Force and Acceleration on a Turntable: The Results, Part 2
From YouTube, produced by North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics
Part of NCSSM Online Physics Collection: This video deals with force and acceleration on a turntable - results. This is part 2 of 2. http://www.dlt.ncssm.edu
 
Found by Joyce Ventimiglia in Force & Balance
February 6, 2012 at 11:12 AM
 
Ages: 15 - 18     License: CC by-nc-sa
 
Rating:  
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   Views: 1157   
 
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Introductory Centripetal Acceleration Problem - Cylindrical Space Station
From YouTube, produced by Jonathan Thomas-Palmer
A cylindrical space station with a radius of 115 m is rotating at 0.292 rad/s. A ladder goes from the rim to the center. What is the magnitude of the centripetal acceleration at (1) the top of the ladder, (2) the middle of the ladder, and (3) the base of the ladder? Want acceleration-problem.html">Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic.

Content Times:
0:12 Translating the problem
1:14 Solving the problem
2:54 Interpreting the results - Artificial Gravity
4:30 What do you feel on the ladder?

Next Video: Centripetal Force Introduction and Demonstration

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Previous Video: acceleration.html">Centripetal Acceleration Introduction

Please support me on Patreon!

Thank you to Scott Carter, Aarti Sangwan and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control Team for this video.

Photo Credits:
2001 Space Station: https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/images/226363main_2001_station_t_full.jpg
Inside Discover 1: https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/images/226358main_2001_exercise_l_full.jpg
Elysium with Earth: http://i.huffpost.com/gen/1304079/images/o-ELYSIUM-EARTH-facebook.jpg
Elysium Concept Art: http://www.geeksofdoom.com/GoD/img/2013/08/2013-08-09-elysium_interior_concept_art.jpg
 
Found by Flipping Physics in Rotational Motion
August 28, 2017 at 11:17 AM
 
Ages: 11 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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A Basic Acceleration Example Problem and Understanding Acceleration Direction
From YouTube, produced by Flipping Physics
This video starts with a simple acceleration problem and then addresses a commonly held misconception that a negative acceleration always means you are slowing down.  I do this by way of examples.  Kate (my wife) drove the Prius with a camera suction cupped to the window and videoed me riding my bike several times.  In the end I ended up with four different examples on the screen at once and 25 different video layers to describe it all.  I am really proud about how well it worked.  Enjoy.

Content Times:
0:26 Reading the problem
0:40 Seeing the problem
1:14 Translating the words to Physics
1:54 Solving the problem
3:50 Why is the number on the bike positive?
4:48 How can the bike be speeding up if the acceleration is negative?
5:50 Comparing velocity and acceleration directions
7:28 All four bike examples on the screen at the same time
7:53 Why isn't there a direction on our answer?
8:51 Outtakes or how the bike riding was filmed

acceleration
-example-problem-and-understanding-acceleration-direction.html">Want Lecture Notes?

Next Video:
Understanding and Walking Position as a function of Time Graphs

Previous Video:
acceleration-with-prius-brake-slamming-example-problem.html">Introduction to Acceleration with Prius Brake Slamming Example Problem
 
Found by Flipping Physics in One-Dimensional Motion
December 22, 2013 at 08:24 AM
 
Ages: 13 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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What is Acceleration? (One-Minute Video Dictionary Series)
From youtube.com, produced by S.Erickson
In this short video, students will learn the definition of "acceleration". Acceleration is defined as "to increase the speed of." Several examples are given (people running, beaters, wheels, TV picture). This is a great resource when introducing this important vocabulary word into the elementary classroom. (01:01)
 
Found by porter1526 in One-Minute Video Dictionary - Series
November 9, 2011 at 06:52 PM
 
Ages: 7 - 12     License: Proprietary
 
Rating:  
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Introduction to Acceleration with Prius Brake Slamming Example Problem
From YouTube, produced by Flipping Physics
This is an introduction to the concept of acceleration.  There is also an example problem showing applying the brakes while driving a car in order to avoid hitting a basketball.  Also included are common mistakes students make while solving a simple problem like this.  It is important to see what those mistakes are because it helps students avoid them in the future.

Content Times:
0:19 The Equation for Acceleration
1:06 The Dimensions for Acceleration
2:18 Acceleration has both Magnitude and Direction
3:00 Reading the Problem
3:15 Video of the Problem
4:29 Translating the Problem to Physics
5:03 Starting to solve the Problem (with mistakes)
5:37 Explaining two mistakes
7:34 Explaining another mistake
10:00 Outtakes (including a basketball dribbling montage)

acceleration
-with-prius-brake-slamming-example-problem.html">Want Lecture Notes?

Next Video:
acceleration-example-problem-and-understanding-acceleration-direction.html">A Basic Acceleration Example Problem and Understanding Acceleration Direction

Previous Video:
Example Problem: Finding Average Speed for Pole Position -- Not as easy as you may think
 
Found by Flipping Physics in One-Dimensional Motion
December 22, 2013 at 08:21 AM
 
Ages: 13 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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A Tale of Three Accelerations
From YouTube, produced by Jonathan Thomas-Palmer
A Silent Film in honor of #DayofSilence to clarify the differences between angular, tangential, and centripetal accelerations. Want accelerations.html ">Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic.

Content Times:
0:20 The three accelerations
0:43 One difference is their units
1:22 How are tangential and centripetal acceleration different?
2:10 Which accelerations are required for circular motion?
3:01 What happens at constant angular velocity?
3:31 More about angular acceleration
4:25 Review

Thank you Bronson Hoover of dnbstudios for your original music composition. Your music offer was the video’s catalyst.

“What will you do to end the silence?”

Next Video: Conical Pendulum Demonstration and Problem

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Previous Video: The Right Hand Rule for Angular Velocity and Angular Displacement

Please support me on Patreon!

Thank you to Bilge Deniz Kocak, Sawdog, and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control Team for this video.

Thank you to Youssef Nasr for transcribing the English subtitles of this video.
 
Found by Flipping Physics in Rotational Motion
April 27, 2018 at 02:06 PM
 
Ages: 10 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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