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Newton's Third Law: Action and Reaction - by StudyJams
From scholastic.com, produced by Scholastic
Energy does not change, and that means that it is constant.  When one object applies force to another, the energy becomes and equal and opposite reaction.  Learn more about Newton's third law of motion with this cartoon animation from StudyJams.  A short, self-checking quiz is also included with this link.
 
Found by begamatt in Newton's Third Law
May 23, 2011 at 07:43 PM
 
Ages: 7 - 12     License: Proprietary
 
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Newton's Third Law of Motion - Khan Academy
From YouTube, produced by Sal Khan
Intuition behind Newton's Third Law of Motion. This video, which is suitable for high school students, starts with a black screen because the instructor, in his conversational tone, uses it as a 'chalkboard.' (09:19)
 
Found by teresahopson in Newton's Third Law
August 14, 2009 at 12:00 PM
 
Ages: 12 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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Newton's Third Law of Motion - Khan Academy
From YouTube, produced by Sal Khan
In this eight-minute video clip, Sal Khan uses computer software and photos to explain Newton's Third Law of Motion. (08:00)
 
Found by teresahopson in Newton's Third Law
June 15, 2011 at 05:01 PM
 
Ages: 13 - 18     License: CC by-nd
 
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Introduction to Newton’s Third Law of Motion
From YouTube, produced by Jonathan Thomas-Palmer
Learn about Newton’s Third Law of Motion. Several examples of Newton’s Third Law Force Pairs are demonstrated and discussed. We even travel to Dandong, China.

Content Times:
0:10 Newton’s Third Law
0:47 Ball and Head Force Pair
1:49 At the Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum
2:35 Why I don’t like the Action/Reaction definition
3:30 Hammer and Nail Force Pair
4:20 Mr.p and Wall Force Pair
4:36 Kevin Zhang and The Great Wall Force Pair
5:23 The Great Wall Location Shots
5:36 Filming the intro

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Next Video: A Common Misconception about Newton's Third Law Force Pairs (or Action-Reaction Pairs)
Previous Video: Using Newton's Second Law to find the Force of Friction
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Many thanks to Kevin Zhang, today's Flipping Physics Correspondent in China and to Ari Morris for letting me use a video of my kids at The Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum from 2007.
 
Found by Flipping Physics in Newton's Third Law
January 19, 2015 at 10:42 AM
 
Ages: 9 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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A Common Misconception about Newton's Third Law Force Pairs (or Action-Reaction Pairs)
From YouTube, produced by Jonathan Thomas-Palmer
Proof that the Force Normal and the Force of Gravity are not a Newton’s Third Law Force Pair.

Content Times:
0:26 Drawing the Free Body Diagram
1:02 Not a Newton’s Third Law Force Pair
1:37 The Force Normal Force Pair
1:55 The Force of Gravity Force Pair

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Next Video: Understanding the Force of Tension
Previous Video: Introduction to Newton's Third Law
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Found by Flipping Physics in Newton's Third Law
March 16, 2015 at 01:43 PM
 
Ages: 10 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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Newton's Third Law of Motion: Astronauts in Outer Space
From pbslearningmedia.org, produced by WGBH Educational Foundation
The sensation of "weightlessness" that orbiting astronauts experience on their missions would seem to make their tasks almost effortless. However, as Newton's third law of motion suggests, working in space can be physically demanding. This video segment, adapted from NOVA, illustrates the significance of Newton's law to space-walking astronauts and the engineers who design their spacecrafts. (04:50)
 
Found by Mrs Jefferies in Newton's Third Law
April 9, 2012 at 12:00 AM
 
Ages: 10 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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Newton's Third Law of Motion - Science of NFL Football
From YouTube, produced by National Science Foundation & NBC Learn
"Science of NFL Football" is a 10-part video series funded by the National Science Foundation and produced in partnership with the National Football League. In this segment, NBC's Lester Holt breaks down Isaac Newton's Third Law of Motion and how energy transfers between football players who collide during a game. Professors Tony Schmitz of the University of Florida and Jim Gates of the University of Maryland explain why momentum can keep a player moving or stop them in their tracks. (04:12)
 
Found by teresahopson in Sports Science
March 22, 2018 at 08:05 PM
 
Ages: 11 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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Newton's Laws of Motion
From youtube.com, produced by Bryan Ierardi
This video shows the three laws of motion developed by Sir Isaac Newton and is done with excellent graphics.
The first law of motion, inertia, is when an object will not move or else move in a straight line unless an unbalanced force acts on it. The second law of motion states that force is the product of mass and acceleration; acceleration fo an object depends on the mass and magnitude of the force. (force=massxacceleration) The third law of motion is the law of action and reaction. In every action there is an equal and opposite action such as in rockets (04:24).
 
Found by freealan in Newton's Laws of Motion
April 17, 2011 at 10:43 PM
 
Ages: 12 - 18     License: Public Domain
 
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Newton's Laws Of Motion: Action And Reaction
From YouTube, produced by European Space Agency Science
This is the  third part of this series. (Part 3/3) Good visual explanation of Newton's Third Law in space. Applicable to middle or high school students. (05:59)
 
Found by folita in Newton's Third Law
November 2, 2011 at 05:39 PM
 
Ages: 12 - 18     License: Undetermined
 
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Introduction to Newton’s First Law of Motion
From YouTube, produced by Jonathan Thomas-Palmer
Learn about Newton’s First Law of Motion with two examples shown. Plus, I snuck in some free body diagrams and subtle hints at Newton’s Second and Third Laws as well. Thank you so much to Mrs. Zeller for being a Flipping Physics Correspondent!

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Content Times:
0:08 Newton’s First Law of Motion
0:34 1st Example: Mrs. Zeller presents an object at rest
1:08 What does it mean “No net external force acting on the rock”?
2:20 2nd Example: An object in motion
3:21 What does “constant velocity” mean?
4:00 Also called the Law of Inertia
4:22 The two most common mistakes students make

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Next Video: Introduction to Newton's 2nd Law with Example Problem

Previous Video: The Reality of our first Free Body Diagram

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Picture Credit: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AIsaac_Newton%2C_English_School%2C_1715-20.jpg
Attributed to 'English School' (Bonhams) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
 
Found by Flipping Physics in Newton's First Law
June 1, 2015 at 01:52 PM
 
Ages: 10 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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AP Physics C: Dynamics Review (Mechanics) - Newton's 3 Laws, Friction, Equilibrium
From YouTube, produced by Jonathan Thomas-Palmer
Calculus based review of Newton’s three laws, basic forces in dynamics such as the force of gravity, force normal, force of tension, force applied, force of friction, free body diagrams, translational equilibrium, the drag or resistive force and terminal velocity. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam.
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Content Times:
0:18 Newton’s First Law
1:30 Newton’s Second Law
1:55 Newton’s Third Law
2:29 Force of Gravity
3:36 Force Normal
3:58 Force of Tension
4:24 Force Applied
4:33 Force of Friction
5:46 Static Friction
6:17 Kinetic Friction
6:33 The Coefficient of Friction
7:26 Free Body Diagrams
10:41 Translational equilibrium
11:41 Drag Force or Resistive Force
13:25 Terminal Velocity

Next Video: AP Physics C: Work, Energy, and Power Review (Mechanics)


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AP Physics C Review Website

Please support me on Patreon!

Thank you to Aarti Sangwan for being my Quality Control help.
 
Found by Flipping Physics in AP Physics C: Mechanics
March 16, 2017 at 02:04 PM
 
Ages: 15 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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Using Newton's Second Law to find the Force of Friction
From YouTube, produced by Jonathan Thomas-Palmer
In order to use Newton’s Second Law, you need to correctly draw the Free Body Diagram. This problem explains a common mistake students make involving the force applied. We also review how to find acceleration on a velocity as a function of time graph.

Content Times:
0:22 The problem
0:54 Listing our known values
1:51 Drawing the Free Body Diagram
2:17 A common mistake in our Free Body Diagram
3:32 Solving the problem
4:14 Another common mistake
5:07 Why is the acceleration positive?

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Next Video: Introduction to Newton’s Third Law of Motion
Previous Video: Summing the Forces is Vector Addition
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Found by Flipping Physics in Forces
January 12, 2015 at 11:53 AM
 
Ages: 10 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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Bill Nye and Newton's Third Law
From YouTube
Here's an old one from Bill Nye. He uses roller skate cars and water balloon passengers to talk about momentum, potential energy, kinetic energy, and impulse (07:29).
 
Found by tyler.arnold in Newton's Third Law
September 4, 2012 at 08:26 PM
 
Ages: 15 - 18     License: Undetermined
 
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LeBron Asks About Newton's Third Law - Khan Academy
From YouTube, produced by Sal Khan + LeBron James Foundation
How does a basketball apply a force to the shooter's hand? (04:01)
 
Found by teresahopson in Newton's Third Law
September 5, 2012 at 10:47 PM
 
Ages: 11 - 18     License: CC by-nc-nd
 
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Newton's Third Law Quiz - Khan Academy
From YouTube, produced by Sal Khan
Sal Khan offers three statements which he leaves for you to decide which one is true. (06:28)
 
Found by teresahopson in Newton's Third Law
July 20, 2012 at 07:58 PM
 
Ages: 15 - 18     License: CC by-nc-nd
 
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Newton's Third Law of Motion
From YouTube, produced by Smart Learning for All
For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. When we sit on a chair, our body exerts a downward force on the chair. The chair also exerts an upward force on the body. If the chair would not have exerted a force, the chair would collapse and we would never be able to sit on a chair. (04:38)
 
Found by teresahopson in Newton's Third Law
March 22, 2018 at 08:02 PM
 
Ages: 9 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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Video Presentation on Newton's First law of Motion
From Curriki, produced by Next Vista
Video Presentation on Newton's First law of Motion comes from NextVista for Learning and presented by Mr. Cervantes. Run time 03:36
 
Found by Larry Sanger in Newton's First Law
June 30, 2009 at 01:00 PM
 
Ages: 12 - 18     License: Undetermined
 
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   Views: 6909   
 
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Newton's Laws of Motion
From YouTube
A four-minute introduction of Newton's Laws of Motion. It is well done with easy to understand explanations. A great video to introduce this topic even for younger students. (04:20)
 
Found by freealan in Newton's Laws of Motion
April 14, 2011 at 09:45 PM
 
Ages: 8 - 18     License: Undetermined
 
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Beyond the Big Bang: Sir Isaac Newton's Law of Gravity
From history.com, produced by History Channel
This four-minute video is about Isaac Newton, the scientists who is said to be the smartest one to have ever lived. Learn about gravity and Newton's analysis on the moon. His laws explain almost everything and is easy for the students to fall. (04:35)
 
Found by freealan in Newton, Isaac
September 12, 2010 at 11:17 PM
 
Ages: 12 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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Newton's 3 Laws, With a Bicycle
From YouTube, produced by TED education
Why would it be hard to pedal a 10,000 pound bicycle? This simple explanation shows how Newton’s 3 laws of motion help you ride your bike.  (03:32)
 
Found by Rockefellerteacher in Newton's Laws of Motion
January 8, 2013 at 10:17 AM
 
Ages: 12 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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Introduction to Newton's Laws
From WatchKnow, produced by MIT Opencourseware
Professor Lewin discusses Newton's Laws. He demonstrates the 3rd law by using a Heros Engine. He also shows how anybody can "shake" the earth by throwing a ball up in the air (49:16).
 
Found by tyler.arnold in Newton's Laws of Motion
July 31, 2012 at 05:42 PM
 
Ages: 16 - 18     License: Undetermined
 
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Newton's Second Law: Acceleration - by StudyJams
From scholastic.com, produced by Scholastic
Acceleration is a change in velocity.  That means acceleration can be a change in motion or speed.  Acceleration can be thought of as an object's change in velocity over time.  Learn more about Newton's Second Law of Motion with this cartoon animation from StudyJams.  A short, self-checking quiz is also included with this link.
 
Found by begamatt in Newton's Second Law
May 27, 2011 at 10:07 PM
 
Ages: 8 - 12     License: Proprietary
 
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Isaac Newton and a Scientific Revolution
From history.com, produced by History Channel
The Protestant Reformation encourages both religious and scientific thought. This is how Newton pioneered many scientific advancements. This is a good video of a unique man and his accomplishments and scientific insights. Very worthwhile for students. (02:47)
 
Found by freealan in Newton, Isaac
October 11, 2010 at 10:36 PM
 
Ages: 10 - 18     License: Undetermined
 
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Newton's Laws of Motion Illustrated with 3D Animations and Motion Graphics
From YouTube
This video illustrates Isaac Newton's three laws of motion. The music is original as are the 3D animations and motion graphics. (04:24)
 
Found by csherell in Newton's Laws of Motion
March 27, 2012 at 09:10 PM
 
Ages: 12 - 18     License: Proprietary
 
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Force Equals Mass Times Acceleration: Newton's Second Law
From Curriki, produced by NASA
This NASA video segment explores how Newton's second law of motion applies to aerospace. Viewers watch an instructor at NASA's National Test Pilot School as he defines the second law and demonstrates how to calculate a person's mass using the law. There is also a discussion about how people experience different g forces at the top and bottom of a roller coaster hill. Footage of the instructor in a fighter jet illustrates what it means to pull 2 and 4 g.
 
Found by Larry Sanger in Newton's Second Law
June 30, 2009 at 01:00 PM
 
Ages: 10 - 18     License: Undetermined
 
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   Views: 3672   
 
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